Looking Back – SummerSlam 1989 Review

SummerSlam 1989 review

We’re going old school. Check out our SummerSlam 1989 review. Continue reading

He’s The Booker, I’m The Blogger: Starrcade 1983 Review

Starrcade 1983 reviewWe have a new feature on this website and as you can see from the above title, we’re going to look at old PPVs (thank you WWE Network) and give you a side-by-side view from the booker perspective as well as the hardcore fan/blogger perspective. Continue reading

WrestleMania 30 For 30 – WrestleMania IV

WrestleMania IV podcast

After the huge show that was WrestleMania III, Superfriends Universe and Fight Game Blog now bring you, our WrestleMania 30 for 30 – WrestleMania IV podcast.

How did the WWF follow up one of their best shows ever? They continued the Andre The Giant vs. Hulk Hogan storyline, yet neither man was champion at the end of the night.

Join Big D, Jason, and I for a comprehensive discussion about WrestleMania IV.

Let us know what you think!

Wrestlemania’s 25 Greatest Matches – Introduction

My FGB brothers and I have put together a list of what we believe to be the greatest matches in Wrestlemania history. We started by selecting all of the matches that we remembered to be in the neighborhood of 3 stars (0-5 scale) or higher, and then took a close look at those matches and rated them fully.

The four of us are distinctive in our tastes for what makes a good pro wrestling match. I wanted to give you an idea of who we are and what we like so you know where we are coming from.

One thing that I want to note is that we’re not giving any special treatment to matches that drew incredible business or are historic because of what they meant to business. Thus, you won’t see Hulk Hogan vs. Andre The Giant. It was a terrible match, and even though it was historic, it wasn’t any good and won’t be on our list.

Big D
Danny says that he likes anything that’s good. He doesn’t like pointless brawling with punches and kicks ending in double countouts. He can go for good high flying matches or good scientific matches as long as they tell stories and have a beginning, middle, and end and contain something that’ll excite him. Some of his favorite eras in wrestling include WWE from 1997-2001, ROH from 2004-2006, and ECW 1995-1999. He also includes Bret Hart, Bryan Danielson, and Ric Flair as three of his favorite wrestlers.
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WrestleMania VII – Tear Drops At Wrestlemania

After the huge main event at Wrestlemania VI where The Ultimate Warrior beat Hulk Hogan for the World Heavyweight Championship, it was pretty much etched in stone that they would have a rematch at Wrestlemania VII. And after selling a ton of tickets at the Skydome in Toronto for Wrestlemania VI, Vince was going to try to do it one better. Actually he was going to try and do better than Wrestlemania III at the Pontiac Silverdome in Detroit where they claim to have put 93,000 butts in the seats. Wrestlemania VII with the Hogan vs. Warrior rematch was going to take place at the LA Coliseum, which can hold over 100,000 people. If you’ve ever seen Wrestlemania VII, you’ll know that Hogan vs. Warrior part two never happened, and it wasn’t held in the outdoor stadium in Los Angeles. Wrestlemania VII was held in the LA Sports Arena which barely holds 15% percent of what the LA Coliseum did, and it was main evented by Sgt. Slaughter as the champ and Hulk Hogan as the All American belt chaser.

How did we get there? Well, after Hogan was beaten by Warrior, the WWF struggled without Hogan. House show business was down and people weren’t really paying to see Warrior like they were Hogan. Let’s face it. Warrior was fun to watch jump up and down while shaking the ropes, but he wasn’t going to be the man. He was horrendous on interviews, couldn’t wrestle for long periods of time despite his awesome physique, which tells you a little bit of how he got that physique, and simply didn’t draw as well as Hogan did as a champion. Also, the Persian Gulf War was going on at the time, and Vince McMahon decided it would be topical if the main WWF storyline carried the same timeliness. Enter Sgt. Slaughter. But not as you’d think. This time the Sarge was as an Iraqi supporter with General Adnan and later, Col. Mustaffa, who is most well known as the Iron Sheik, in his corner. It’s a horrible storyline if you think about it. It was a fake sentiment created by a storyline that took advantage of a war situation. Typical classy wrestling.

Since there was no way the WWF was going to sell anywhere near the number of tickets needed for the LA Coliseum, they opted for the smaller LA Arena, but used the excuse that because the Iraqi supporting Slaughter was so hated, they were worried things could get out of control in an outdoor stadium and thus had to move indoors. But they never answered the question as to how they would fit all those fans who bought tickets into the smaller arena. It’s because they never sold enough tickets.

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WWE Legends Of Wrestlemania Roster

I have a feeling my kids are going to want this game badly, even if they’re too young to have watched many of these guys wrestle.

Here’s the list of wrestlers and managers in the game according to IGN.com.

Andre The Giant
Jimmy “Superfly” Snuka
Animal
Junk Yard Dog
Arn Anderson
Kamala
Bam Bam Bigelow
King Kong Bundy
Big Bossman
Koko B. Ware
Big John Studd
Michael Hayes
Bret Hart
Mr. Perfect
British Bulldog
Nikolai Volkoff
Brutus “The Barber” Beefcake
Ravishing Rick Rude
Dusty Rhodes
Ric Flair
Greg “The Hammer” Valentine
Rowdy Roddy Piper
Hacksaw Jim Duggan
Sgt. Slaughter
Hawk
Shawn Michaels
Honky Tonk Man
Stone Cold Steve Austin
Hulk Hogan
The Million Dollar Man Ted Dibiase
Hunter Hearst Helmsley
The Rock
Iron Sheik
Ultimate Warrior
Jake The Snake
Undertaker
Jim “The Anvil” Neidhart
Yokozuna
Bobby “The Brain” Heenan
Mr. Fuji
Jimmy Hart
Paul Bearer