FGB Radio – Cauliflower Alley Club

Cauliflower Alley Club

FGB Radio is back with a podcast about the Cauliflower Alley Club. “Double D” Dave Dutra (@DaveDutra) and Premier president John LaRocca (@LaRoccaJL) join me, as they did in Las Vegas, where we spent some time together at the 51st Cauliflower Alley Club.

We first start out with the news of Chyna’s passing which just hit as we started recording.

We talk about past CAC experiences by both Dutra and LaRocca who have been before. We talk about what has changed and what has stayed the same. I was there a day early, so I talk about the Bockwinkel blowout. We discuss the panels including the one on Minnesota wrestling with Larry “The Axe” Hennig, Greg Gagne, and Jim Brunzell and the broadcasting panel that should’ve been. We all have our thoughts on what went well and what didn’t go so well. What a star studded panel it was.

Then we talk about the banquet with great speeches by JJ Dillon, Arn Anderson, Jerry Lawler, Lance Russell, Paul Orndorff, and Trish Stratus. We quickly go over Ken Patera’s polarizing speech.

Right click to download the show or stream below.

Road To WrestleMania XXX – Hulk Hogan

Hulk Hogan's WrestleMania

Via WWE.com

The Hulkster hasn’t had a match at WrestleMania since his match in 2002 against the Rock. But I thought it’d be nice to look back at the guy who carried WrestleMania in its early years and is back for the 30th one. Continue reading

WrestleMania 30 For 30 – WrestleMania 1

WrestleMania 30 For 30

As we discussed in the WrestleMania 30 for 30 preview show, we are dropping the first WrestleMania 30 for 30 show today.

Big D, Jason, and I discuss all the build up, hype, angles, and information from that time frame.

Check out our first WrestleMania 30 for 30.

Let us know what you think!

Wrestlemania 21 – Wrestlemania Blows Through Hollywood

In 2004, Vince McMahon gave die-hard wrestling fans their wish. Undervalued wrestlers, Eddie Guerrero and Chris Benoit were at the top of the mountain and fans were happy. But soon thereafter, both men who were at the top of their careers, were soon beltless. Guerrero lost the WWE Championship to JBL who was a good character, but not a wrestler of Guerrero’s caliber. Benoit would eventually lose his World Championship to Randy Orton in August of 2004. In Guerrero’s case, he wasn’t ready to be champ according to him. He wasn’t ready to handle the responsibility of being in the main event every week and being the most important wrestler on the Smackdown brand. Benoit’s reason for losing was a little different. Vince McMahon wanted to capitalize on a hot Randy Orton, even though it killed Orton in the process.

As Wrestlemania 21 neared, the two champions were Triple H from the Raw brand and JBL from the Smackdown brand. Vince was ready to use younger (not by age in Batista’s case, but by how long he’s been around) stars and see if they could become headlining stars. These men weren’t undervalued ring generals like Guerrero and Benoit. You could actually make a case of them being overvalued and overrated. But one thing was certain. Both guys were over with their fans. Dave Batista wasn’t supposed to be the guy in the role of future champion. That guy was supposed to be Randy Orton. But when Orton beat Benoit for the belt at SummerSlam, he was subsequently turned face, and Triple H came in, killed him dead and picked up his lost pieces (the championship) in the process.

Orton was no longer championship material, and he was thrown into a match with The Undertaker. When Orton was floundering after the reasonless face turn, Batista became “the cool one” of Evolution. Big Dave was now being booked in Orton’s spot and he was a cool heel. His angle with Triple H was becoming a huge box office draw, and Batista was on his way. But was he ready to take the strap at Wrestlemania?
Continue reading

Wrestlemania 2 – Pearl Harbor

WrestleMania 2I remember it like it was yesterday. I was watching Saturday Night’s Main Event where the big angle for this Wrestlemania started. The main event was scheduled for Hulk Hogan vs. The Magnificent Muraco and instead of Muraco’s regular manager Mr. Fuji by his side, Bobby Heenan was in his corner. They said that Fuji had the flu, which was an angle alert. However, I was only nine so I didn’t know about angle alerts. During the match, Hogan went after Heenan and King Kong Bundy came in to attack Hogan and “pearl harbor” him as Vince McMahon would say. It was a sneak attack that left Hogan laying in the ring, taking big splash after big splash. As a young Hulkamaniac, I was devastated. I had just been turned on to wrestling the year before by my best friend at the time, and I bit hook, line, and sinker. There I was, up at midnight, watching my hero take the beating of his life. Bundy was played up huge. He was a mountain of a man. He actually resembled the letter “O” with his short but fat torso and lack of neck. He used to be called a condominium with legs. As Hogan lay lifeless in the ring, I was upset at this guy with the bald head and wrinkled forehead. But I was smart enough to know my guy was going to get revenge. The storyline was that Hogan was in the hospital suffering from rib injuries and you could write the Hulkster to wish him well. I wasn’t that gullible, but I know other young kids were. They even had Mean Gene Okerlund talk to the doctor and they showed x-rays of Hogan to sell the angle. They would meet again in the main event of Wrestlemania 2 and in a steel cage.

Continue reading