Ranking WrestleMania – Part 2

ranking wrestlemania

Check out part two of our series of posts ranking WrestleMania.

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Looking Back – SummerSlam 1996 Review

SummerSlam 1996

We’re continuing SummerSlam week on Fight Game Blog. Check out our SummerSlam 1996 throwback review. Continue reading

WrestleMania 30 For 30 – WrestleMania IV

WrestleMania IV podcast

After the huge show that was WrestleMania III, Superfriends Universe and Fight Game Blog now bring you, our WrestleMania 30 for 30 – WrestleMania IV podcast.

How did the WWF follow up one of their best shows ever? They continued the Andre The Giant vs. Hulk Hogan storyline, yet neither man was champion at the end of the night.

Join Big D, Jason, and I for a comprehensive discussion about WrestleMania IV.

Let us know what you think!

Greatest Wrestlers Of The WrestleMania Era Final List

Our project started many months ago, and for the last two and a half months, we’ve been counting down who we believe are the greatest wrestlers of the WrestleMania era. We talked about how we ranked them in the introduction.

I want to thank Duan, Alan, Big D, Jason, and Cadillac Don for all of their help in putting together the list and writing the short bios. It was a tremendously fun project and I’m happy with the way it turned out.

Here is the final ranking along with a link to every write-up:

1. Steve Austin (Alan)
2. Bret Hart (Duan)
3. Shawn Michaels (Duan)
4. Ric Flair (GG)
5. Randy Savage (Don)
6. Kurt Angle (Big D)
7. Chris Jericho (Don)
8. Eddy Guerrero (Alan)
9. The Rock (GG)
10. Curt Hennig (Duan)
11. Terry Funk (Alan)
12. Chris Benoit (Don)
13. The Undertaker (Duan)
14. Mick Foley (GG)
15. Rey Mysterio (Alan)
16. Hulk Hogan
17. Ricky Steamboat (GG)
18. Bryan Danielson (Jason)
19. Jake Roberts (Big D)
20. Ted DiBiase (Big D)
21. Owen Hart (Jason)
22. Big Van Vader (Alan)
23. Rowdy Roddy Piper (Big D)
24. Triple H (Don)
25. Rick Rude (Big D)

Greatest Wrestlers Of The WrestleMania Era: #19 – Jake “The Snake” Roberts

Other than the piledriver, perhaps no other move during the WrestleMania era has been as feared as the DDT. It’s creator was equally intimidating. Jake “The Snake” Roberts had something. Paul Heyman called it an “intangible”. Jake “The Snake” Roberts completely changed the way that wrestlers did interviews. Rather than scream and holler at the camera and make threats, the way the majority of wrestling promos worked for decades, Jake spoke in a very calm and monotone matter and delivered cerebral and at times, frightening, promos. Backed by a strangely nightmarish, yet invigorating, charisma, Jake put a stranglehold on the audience’s mind like no other. Other than that, Jake will always be remembered for carrying a giant snake to the ring in a sack to intimidate his opponents.

Jake’s promo from Wrestlemania VI to Ted Dibiase, a man he feuded with for nearly a year:

Jake’s WWF run was filled with some of wrestling’s most brutal moments. His first feud with Ricky “The Dragon” Steamboat took a dangerous turn when Jake DDT’d Ricky on the concrete floor and cracked his head like a coconut. Jake legitimately knocked Ricky out cold. Then a short while later, Honky Tonk Man cracked Jake in the side of the head with a guitar to build up a match for Wrestlemania III. The plan was for Honky to hit Jake with a worked “trick” guitar, but somebody wound up making a mistake and replacing it with a real guitar, causing a concussion in Robert’s head that led to his pain pill addiction. After this, Jake became a wildly popular babyface and began to battle heels such as Ted Dibiase, Bad News Brown, and an awesome feud with “Ravishing” Rick Rude after Rude hit on Jake’s real life wife Cheryl who was in the front row.
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Wrestlemania XII – The Iron Man Match

Wrestlemania XII was total one trick pony. There are wrestling cards that only promise one great match, but the possibly is there for good matches on the undercard. Here, WWE simply said, “We are going to give you the main event, and it’s going to be an hour long, and we really don’t care what else is on this show.” If you think about it from a time standpoint, you have one match that is going to take a full hour out of your three hour PPV. The rest of the matches and skits will have to be cut into two hours. Basically they cared about the main event and nothing else. I guess they did promise us the Ultimate Warrior again.

The Shawn Michaels vs. Bret Hart match was a good match, but over the years, it has been called the greatest match in Wrestlemania history by WWE. It’s not. Our own Big D calls it the most overrated match in Wrestlemania history. It was built up on television as “a boyhood dream” for Michaels to win the belt. As the story went, Michaels had been a wrestling fan as a kid and even though he was on the smaller side, he always wanted to win the WWF Heavyweight Title in a league of gargantuan monsters. Since Vince McMahon was giving us two great wrestlers in the main event rather than two slow moving, punching and kicking heavyweights, he made sure that we were going to see pure wrestling. He made it an Iron Man match. The rules of an Iron Man match are simple. There is a clock set with a one hour time limit. The person who scores the most falls in one hour wins. The hardest thing to do in a match like this is to keep the fans entertained at the same time as making sure the wrestlers don’t wear themselves out. Michaels and Hart paced themselves, but it still wasn’t intriguing enough live as many of the fans left before the match was over. Some detractors say that although they were entertained for most of the entire hour, they didn’t like the finish. Neither man won a fall in the entire hour and Bret Hart decided that since it was a draw, he was still champion. WWF President at the time, Gorilla Monsoon came out and said there must be a winner and ruled that the contest must continue and there would be a winner in sudden death. Soon thereafter, Shawn Michaels broke the Hitman’s heart with the sweet chin music and won the match and the title.
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