King Of The Ring – King Of All Kings Tournament: Bret Hart Vs. Haku

Bret Hart vs. HakuWe’re in our second-to-last quarterfinals match-up. In one corner, you have the best there is, was, and ever will be. And in the other, you have one of the toughest guys in wrestling history. It’s Bret Hart vs. Haku. It’s time to debate what should be a fairly simple decision.

Bret Hart vs. Haku

Don: This would be a great underdog matchup for Bret. Continue reading

King Of The Ring – King Of All Kings Tournament: Haku Vs. Billy Gunn

Haku vs. Billy Gunn

This is probably the worst first round match-up of the tournament, coming right after what was our best when Bret Hart and Kurt Angle collided.

Most of us are big Haku fans and not necessarily Gunn fans, but let’s see how this one shakes out.

Haku vs. Billy Gunn

Duan: This is the YouTube pre-show match of our tournament.

GG: The one squash of the tourney?

Big D: Yep.

Alan: Here’s the thing with Bill Gunn. I LOVED Bill Gunn for the longest time. I only stopped loving Bill Gunn because I got hammered over the head with people saying how horrible he is, and then I started to believe that myself. But man, in 1993 ain’t nobody had a better running leapfrog than Smokin’ Bill Gunn!

GG: Bill Gunn! Continue reading

2013 King Of The Ring Tournament – King Of All Kings

King Of The Ring - King Of All Kings

Being wrestling fans, we love tournaments. One specific tournament that we loved was the old King Of The Ring tournament. Since WWE has been so inconsistent with the King Of The Ring tournament (last tournament was in 2010 and the last PPV was in 2002), the FGB crew decided to put together a tournament of our own, the King Of All Kings tournament.

We decided to take all the PPV winners of the King Of The Ring tournament and add some guys who were also deemed “king” in WWF rings over the year. Two specific “kings” we didn’t add were Jerry “The King” Lawler since he was king before he came to the WWF and Hacksaw King who was just awful.

We created a 16-man bracket and put all the names into a random draw.

Here’s video evidence of the random draw: Continue reading

WrestleMania VII – Tear Drops At Wrestlemania

After the huge main event at Wrestlemania VI where The Ultimate Warrior beat Hulk Hogan for the World Heavyweight Championship, it was pretty much etched in stone that they would have a rematch at Wrestlemania VII. And after selling a ton of tickets at the Skydome in Toronto for Wrestlemania VI, Vince was going to try to do it one better. Actually he was going to try and do better than Wrestlemania III at the Pontiac Silverdome in Detroit where they claim to have put 93,000 butts in the seats. Wrestlemania VII with the Hogan vs. Warrior rematch was going to take place at the LA Coliseum, which can hold over 100,000 people. If you’ve ever seen Wrestlemania VII, you’ll know that Hogan vs. Warrior part two never happened, and it wasn’t held in the outdoor stadium in Los Angeles. Wrestlemania VII was held in the LA Sports Arena which barely holds 15% percent of what the LA Coliseum did, and it was main evented by Sgt. Slaughter as the champ and Hulk Hogan as the All American belt chaser.

How did we get there? Well, after Hogan was beaten by Warrior, the WWF struggled without Hogan. House show business was down and people weren’t really paying to see Warrior like they were Hogan. Let’s face it. Warrior was fun to watch jump up and down while shaking the ropes, but he wasn’t going to be the man. He was horrendous on interviews, couldn’t wrestle for long periods of time despite his awesome physique, which tells you a little bit of how he got that physique, and simply didn’t draw as well as Hogan did as a champion. Also, the Persian Gulf War was going on at the time, and Vince McMahon decided it would be topical if the main WWF storyline carried the same timeliness. Enter Sgt. Slaughter. But not as you’d think. This time the Sarge was as an Iraqi supporter with General Adnan and later, Col. Mustaffa, who is most well known as the Iron Sheik, in his corner. It’s a horrible storyline if you think about it. It was a fake sentiment created by a storyline that took advantage of a war situation. Typical classy wrestling.

Since there was no way the WWF was going to sell anywhere near the number of tickets needed for the LA Coliseum, they opted for the smaller LA Arena, but used the excuse that because the Iraqi supporting Slaughter was so hated, they were worried things could get out of control in an outdoor stadium and thus had to move indoors. But they never answered the question as to how they would fit all those fans who bought tickets into the smaller arena. It’s because they never sold enough tickets.

Continue reading

Wrestlemania VI – Hogan Passes The Torch, Sort Of

Dubbed, “The Ultimate Challenge”, Wrestlemania VI was a one match show. Everything on WWF TV at the time was done to build up this match. And there was good reason. It was the most important match for the company since Hulk Hogan vs. Andre The Giant at Wrestlemania III. Hulk Hogan was on his way out to do a movie and the WWF needed The Ultimate Warrior to be the man to take his place. Actually, they needed someone hip to rejuvenate Hogan’s slightly stale act too. Warrior was probably the right guy since his popularity was at an all time high. But technically, the money in Warrior was in him chasing the title, not being the one to hold it for very long. Thinking back, it might not have been bad to give it to Rick Rude or Ted DiBiase, and then have Warrior chase them for the championship, rather than having Hogan drop it to Warrior. But then again, this was one of the biggest money matches in the history of the company. The Warrior was already Intercontinental Champion and his popularity was nearly as high, or higher at the time, than Hogan’s. But that doesn’t necessarily translate into people paying money to see him. It was a short lived feud, and one of the reasons babyface vs. babyface feuds don’t work is because once the match is over, the feud is probably over unless someone turns heel.

The build up was incredible for this match. They first touched each other at the Royal Rumble. They both threw everyone else over the top rope and the two of them were in the ring together. They both went into the ropes. Hogan dropped down, Warrior jumped over him, Hogan missed a clothesline as Warrior ducked it, and then they hit the double clothesline that put both of them on the floor. Then they finally came to blows at Saturday Night’s Main Event as they teamed up together in a match. After they won the match, the Genius and Mr. Perfect jumped them, dumping Hogan out of the ring. Warrior fought off both guys until Hogan came back in the ring and Warrior accidentally hit Hogan. It was at this time that I figured out, even as a young wrestling fan, that the belt was going to switch hands at Mania. When Warrior hit Hogan, there weren’t many boos. It was exactly what the WWF had wanted. Someone else who could take the ball and run with it. At least, that’s what they had thought, though it didn’t necessarily happen that way.

The rest of the card was very suspect. There weren’t any other top matches, and probably the hottest secondary feud was Dusty Rhodes vs. Randy Savage. They faced off in an inter-gender tag team match. It was Dusty Rhodes and his valet, Sapphire vs. the Macho King Randy Savage and Queen Sherri. The match was a joke, but in an interesting twist, Elizabeth came down ringside to support Dusty and Sapphire. It was never shown that she hated Savage, only that she hated Sheri. This was important, because Savage and Elizabeth would get back together at the following Wrestlemania in one of the greatest love stories ever seen. Rhodes and Sapphire won the match thanks to Elizabeth who tripped up Sherri. Sapphire had no wrestling experience and did one suplex that only looked like a suplex because Sheri bumped big for her. And, she should’ve stayed out of spandex.

Continue reading