WrestleMania 30 For 30 – WrestleMania XI

WrestleMania xi review

In the latest episode of WrestleMania 30 For 30, Jason, Big D and GG discuss WrestleMania XI in extensive detail.

For a show that isn’t a favorite of ours, we sure as hell had a lot to talk about.

Lawrence Taylor in Hartford? WrestleMania in Hartford?

We covered the following on this show and more:

– The terrible year for wrestling that was 1995
– The major hype job for Lawrence Taylor and Bam Bam Bigelow
– Bret Hart’s worst match
– Shawn vs. Diesel
– Hulk Hogan and Randy Savage in WCW
– Roddy Piper – What do ya say?

It’s not the best of WWF, but that makes it all that much more interesting to talk about.

Here’s our WrestleMania XI review:

Five Men Who Would DESTROY Jon “Bones” Jones

With the absolute chaos that has gone on this past week in the Ultimate Fighting Championships, saying that Jon “Bones” Jones got on Dana White’s bad side would be an understatement. Bones isn’t exactly the biggest draw in MMA right now and yet, he’s still complaining about paydays and fights and backing out of them as if he were God’s gift to the Octagon. I have a strange feeling Dana White is feeling very much what Vince McMahon did during Summerslam 1991 towards the Ultimate Warrior; he’s biting his nails in anticipation for somebody with a bit more… class… spirit… awareness….. to take that strap off of Bones.

But don’t worry Dana, your hero, the Emperor, has a solution for you. In fact, I have five. Here are Five Guys that Dana White could hire as potential fighters to defeat Jonny “Bones” Jones.

I was on Bones’ jock HARD before anybody else, so obviously I know of his strengths and weaknesses and know his kryptonite. Not even the “brilliant” Greg Jackson has an answer…

A Fight Game Blog Production, In association with SuperfriendsUniverse.com…

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Video Vault – Ric Flair vs. Bob Backlund 1982

In the 80s, when two big champions squared off face to face – it was a big deal and almost always guaranteed a sell out.

Today we present a face to face back and forth promo between WWWF Champion Bob Backlund and NWA World Heavyweight Champion “Nature Boy” Ric Flair, hyping up a big unification match to happen on Independence Day – July 4th, 1982, at the Omni in Atlanta, GA. In the early 80s, Georgia was one of the hottest territories in the country and the Omni was a perfect building to host this big match.

Thanks to Jared Cheeseman for the heads-up

Wrestlemania XI – Whaddya Say?

For only the second time in Wrestlemania history, the WWF/WWE champion was not in the main event in Wrestlemania XI. You had a former champion in Bret “The Hitman” Hart and Shawn Michaels, the future champion, and neither guy was in the main event. Well just who was in the main event for this Wrestlemania? The first guy was Bam Bam Bigelow. And the second? Old LT himself, Lawrence Taylor. This program was initially supposed to help Bigelow’s career. Even by losing to an NFL superstar, Bigelow was supposed to actually gain from the rub and become a regular main eventer.

It was one of the least inspired Wrestlemania cards at least as far as ring work was concerned. Usually there is one “showstopper” match that carries the rest of the card. Sometimes, there’s more than one. But this year, there wasn’t one quality wrestling match. The one expected to at least be half decent was the Bret Hart vs. Bob Backlund “I Quit/Submission” grudge match. Roddy Piper was announced as the surprise guest referee. Here’s where this match went wrong. Originally announced as a submission match where the only way you can win is to submit your opponent, Piper, on the fly, turned the match into an “I Quit” match. Hart wouldn’t even have Backlund in a submission hold and Piper would yell, “Whaddya say?” and you’d hear a pissed off Backlund yell, “no!” as if to say, “If you understood the rules, you wouldn’t be asking me this question.” It was a garbled mess and one of the few matches in his career where it seemed Bret Hart didn’t really have control. There’s another more famous match where he didn’t have control, but we won’t go there. The match ended with Hart finally submitting Backlund in his own chicken wing submission finisher, but to the audience, you couldn’t really tell if Backlund submitted or not. It was just an awful match.
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Wrestlemania IX – The Worst Wrestlemania Ever?

WrestleMania IXAlan and I have differing opinions on this show. He actually liked it while I hated it. I’ll sprinkle in some of his thoughts as we go.

The Hulk Hogan era was supposed to be over. The WWF was slowly changing the guard. They were trying to change what they had ingrained into fans on what wrestling was supposed to be. Bigger than life characters. Huge muscle bound guys are always better than smaller, faster guys. And Hulk Hogan was the best of them all. However, there was going to be a time when Hogan wasn’t going to be around. And during 1993, they were trying to change what they had been teaching fans for 10 years. Bret Hart beat Ric Flair for the championship to get his first WWF World Title reign in late 1992. I remember the day when I heard Hart won the championship. My friend told me to guess who had just beat Flair for the belt, and because I never expected the WWF to get behind Hart, I must’ve went through five guys before I guessed Hart. And I expected him to be nothing more than a transitional champion. However, it showed that the WWF was trying to find someone new to carry the torch so to speak. However, Hogan came back into the picture. It was supposed to be the first Wrestlemania without Hogan. Pro Wrestling Illustrated’s Wrestlemania preview didn’t even list Hogan as being on the card. Hogan came back into the picture quickly as Vince probably didn’t see Wrestlemania being big without him. Hogan held all the cards back then, which is a far cry from where he is today. Of course, Hogan reportedly wanted to win the belt immediately, but if Bret Hart was ever going to be anything, losing it to Hogan in a squash would’ve killed any steam he had. Hogan was then put into a quick feud with Money Inc. where he saved his good friend Ed Leslie, better known as Brutus Beefecake, from a beat down and they played up on the true story of Beefcake having to get reconstructive surgery on his face in a para sailing accident. Hogan and Beefcake were now to challenge Ted DiBiase and IRS (Mike Rotunda) for the tag team championship. They were terribly called The Mega-Maniacs.

(I seem to remember them announcing this terrible name on RAW. They were trying to come up with a name and all of a sudden, Hogan said the name The Mega-Maniacs. However, I believe Jimmy Hart’s jacket already had the name on the back before they were trying to come up with the name. Oops.)

It was a very boring match, but the crowd popped like crazy for it. Hogan was up to his usual antics very much so through the entire match playing up to the crowd. With DiBiase and IRS in the ring, it made the match at least watchable, but the fans very much so wanted a title change. The finish was extremely silly with Jimmy Hart counting a double pin fall that was later overturned by the referee. When Hogan and Beefecake didn’t get the belts, that should have told the viewers something, considering Hogan had never been in anything short of the main event in Wrestlemania.

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